On the beach / Fire Island, Provincetown and Nantucket | Photographs by PaJaMa, 1937-1950

PaJaMa, Monroe Wheeler, Provincetown, 1947
 PaJaMa, Fidelma Cadmus, Fire Island, 1937
 PaJaMa, Fidelma Cadmus, Fire Island, 1941
Fidelma Cadmus, Margaret French and Paul Cadmus, Fire Island, 1939
PaJaMa, Margaret French, George Tooker and Jared French, Nantucket,  1946
PaJaMa, Jensen Yow, Jack Fontan, Bill Harris, Fire Island, 1950
PaJaMa, Margaret French and Paul Cadmus, Nantucket, 1946
PaJaMa, George Tooker and Jared French, Provincetown, 1940
PaJaMa, Monroe Wheeler, Provincetown, 1947                                         PaJaMa, José Martinez, Fire Island, 1948
PaJaMa, George Platt Lynes and Jonathan Tichenor, Fire Island, 1941


PaJaMa, an acronym for Paul-Jared-Margaret, was a collaboration between the artists Paul
 Cadmus, Jared French and Margaret French. Influenced by Carl Jung’s idea of the 
collective unconscious, these three artists known for their magical realism in other media 
collaborated in making photographs at the beaches of Fire Island, Provincetown and 
Nantucket as well as New York and New Jersey during the late 1930s through 
the early 1950s.

J[A-Z]Z / p1ck ( In a Minor Groove | Dorothy Ashby And Frank Wess, 1958

Dorothy Ashby And Frank Wess, In a Minor Groove, 1958

Dorothy Ashby And Frank Wess, Rascallity, 1958

Recorded at Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey
on September 19, 1958

Dorothy Ashby – harp
Frank Wess – flute
Herman Wright – bass
Roy Haynes – drums

In a Minor Groove also released as Dorothy Ashby Plays for Beautiful People, 1958

Dorothy Ashby & Frank Wess - Alone Together, 1958

Dorothy Ashby, 1958


Also:


Poems are en route | Paul Celan, 1958

John Everett Millais, A Message from the Sea, 1884

"A poem, being an instance of language, hence essentially dialogue, may be a letter 
in a bottle thrown out to the sea with the—surely not always strong—hope that it may 
somehow wash up somewhere, perhaps on the shoreline of the heart. In this way, too,
 poems are en route: they are headed towards. Toward what? Toward something open, 
inhabitable, an approachable you, perhaps, an approachable reality. Such realities are,
 I think, at stake in a poem."

Paul Celan, 1958
Celan’s speech when he won the Bremen literature prize

Also:

A new reality / An event of reading | Cassandra Falke, 2016

unknown

 "The event of reading, like the event of loving, is singular. Just as our love for another 
creates a new reality as it unfolds, each reading of a particular text makes us lovers 
without precedent. Reading creates in us new ways of loving, and thus new ways 
of being. Or it can. In order for a book to work on us this way, we have to open 
ourselves up to an intentionality and signifying practice that originates outside of 
our own "egological sphere." Because we cannot anticipate the way we will be
 changed by an event of reading, we commit ourselves first to the act of surrender 
itself and, through that surrender of our own intentionality, find ourselves remade."

Cassandra Falke, The Phenomenology of Love and Reading, 2016

Also:
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